The evolution of parenthood

I had a chat with my friend about the public discussion whether homosexual couples can adopt or educate children. All speakers seem to be guided by the future prosperity of the children, having arguments about missing patterns, confusion in traditional values and a wide range of potential risks.

One part of my self understands such debates as manifestation of democracy and a gateway to liberal legislation. The second part considers such debates to be useless or even waste of time.

In my opinion, sexual orientation has such influence on the quality of parenthood as a place of birth. Neither of which we can change. But regardless of place of birth or sexual orientation, each one of us can have enough love and ability to take care of another human being. And this is, again in my personal opinion, the only meaningful optics to read the issue.

Perhaps the same discussion was led by the representatives of the plant kingdom a few million years ago. For a long time, they couldn’t agree on the rights of male and female plants, about competencies and responsibilities for offspring. Perhaps even a war has occurred and most of the plants with declared sexuality have been destroyed. Only a few resistant species remained like nettle, and since then it has been said that nettle couldn’t be burn even by frost.

A large group of peaceful plants that considered offspring higher than ego went through an admirable transformation. In order to avoid fighting of genders, they began to create both – male and female organs in the same flower. And this concept is dominant in the plant kingdom today.

I am afraid, that humankind is far behind the plants in evolution. But I still hope in healthy mind and loving heart.

Ivana

Advertisements

Sleeping runners

While we anticipate movement of animals, we expect plants sit quietly in one place. But there is a group of plants that hide running shoes. They mostly grow in steppes, where the open space provides the right atmosphere to enjoy cross-country running.

As the average temperature rises and rainfall decreases, steppe plants appear in my area as well. One of them is field eryngo (Eryngium campestre), currently looking like a regular green plant, maybe like a kind of thistle. I have met many on my walk along the path and in the middle of it. At the moment, they looked satisfied and settled, full of fresh juice.

You wouldn’t guess that in a few months, the green splendor will develop a big thorny air ball, running for freedom with the support of wind.

I understand that growing and reproducing in steppe conditions is difficult, so the running capability is a gift to make it easier. On the other hand, I am a bit nervous how much field eryngo I have met. What if local plants don’t survive in the competition? Obviously, I will have an opportunity to watch evolution step by step.

Until then I can imagine the full shelf of running shoes that field eryngo hides in the roots 😊

With love,

Ivana