Spring flowers syrup

Most of spring flowers are naturally juicy similar to the soil after snow melting. There was almost no snow in my area this year and now the soil is very dry even in the beginning of April. I was foraging violets and they had for my surprise really unpleasant taste. Later I realized it was due to lack of irrigation.

However, I wanted to prepare tasty syrup from spring flowers. After disaster with violets I foraged some young flowers (buds) of Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) even they were also rare because of drought. In my language, the name of Butterbur sounds like “9 powers” and this is something that can be useful. I have already mentioned its quality here Power of Butterbur, so we are kind of fellows some time.

But for the first time I decided to make syrup. Butterbur has very specific taste and you need to get used to it. I am happy with the result, the consistency is similar to honey and the final taste is emphasized with a little lemon. Now I have my 9 sweet powers for morning porridge 😊

My one small jar success made me hungry for another one. Yesterday I foraged Lungwort and I was lucky to find some really sweet violets. Feeling like an experienced master, I put them into the procedure. Everything looked good, but also according to the proverb “pride precedes a fall”.

When I poured the hot syrup into a jar, it broke and most of the hot and sweet liquid flooded the kitchen counter. I was lucky that only a few drops hit my hand, which I then treated with cold water and the oil from St.John’s wort. The great success of this attempt is: I have no blisters! 😋

Waiting for another experiment, Ivana

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Power of Butterbur

In my language, name of Butterbur sounds like 9 powers. This clearly demonstrates how effective and respectable plant Butterbur is.

Additionally to the healing effects, Butterbur is amazing plant. In the early spring, still in the snow, you can see around small water streams purple flower heads of Butterbur. They look fabulous. I have to admire them every year. You might think they have to be hard and tough when grown in snow. Be careful, they are easily breakable and full of cold water. I love to keep this fresh spring beauty in alcohol as a tincture because it helps preventively in time of cold and flu.

The most popular part for healing is root of Butterbur. And the best harvesting time is either in the early spring or in the late autumn, it means now! When you slice washed root and place pieces to dry, they look like magical rings of irregular shapes which can be created only by nature. Powdered root of Butterbur can be used directly or inside of tincture depending on type of healing.

Pay special attention to leaves of Butterbur. They are huge like umbrellas and often occupy large territory, so it is hard to pass through. They are very juicy and no wonder. Look at the leaf in detail and you will see large veins for water and nutrients transport. And this is how they work on human body. Because of juicy consistence Butterbur leaves represent effective skin treatment. All healing substances are quickly delivered to the right destination. You can use it directly without any complicate preparation. Just put slightly damaged leaves on affected area and you will see a miracle soon.

For me, density of robust veins inside of Butterbur leaves means a clear hint. They are more than useful for treatment of varicose veins and helpful in arteries unblocking.

Butterbur is also effective in releasing spasm of nervous origin, so you can imagine veins of the plant as healthy nerve fibers. No tension, no obstacles. That’s why some people use remedies based on Butterbur in treatment of migraine and headache. Luckily, at this point I don’t have any personal experience. What about you? Do you have any experience or impressions with Butterbur?